The Practitioner - 1868-2018: Supporting general practitioners for 150 years - History taking the key to diagnosing food allergy in children
 
 
 
 
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Gregory I, Fox AT, Fitzsimons R. History taking the key to diagnosing food allergy in children. Practitioner July/Aug 2018;262(1817)23-26

History taking the key to diagnosing food allergy in children

25 Jul 2018Registered users

Allergy to milk and egg are the two most prevalent food allergies in children. They are typically diagnosed in infancy and carry a good prognosis with the majority of cases resolving before the child reaches school age. Other allergies may present later in childhood and are more likely to persist. There is evidence of a causal link between early onset severe and widespread eczema that is unresponsive to moderate topical steroids and development of IgE mediated food allergy, in particular peanut allergy. The EAT study showed that infants who were weaned early and exposed to egg and peanut had a significant reduction in allergy to both foods.



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