Login:
 
Rees J. Ethnic groups differ in their attitudes to testing for suspected prostate cancer. Practitioner 2015; 259 (1781):7

Ethnic groups differ in their attitudes to testing for suspected prostate cancer

23 Apr 2015Pais-up subscribers

Black men are less likely to choose investigation for symptoms that may herald prostate cancer, at all levels of risk, a UK study has found. A total of 555 men (286 black, 269 white), aged ≥ 40, were approached while awaiting a GP appointment and recruited to the study from four GP surgeries in Bristol. This study emphasises ethnic differences in attitudes towards prostate cancer diagnosis, and a different approach to risk. It is important therefore to be aware of these differences when discussing investigations with Afro-Caribbean men. Better targeting of PSA testing in higher risk black men is vital if we are to lessen the disparate burden this disease has on the Afro-Caribbean population.

Paid-up subscribersThis article can be accessed only if you are a paid-up subscriber to The Practitioner.

To view current online and print subscription rates, and to contact the subscription department, click Subscribe today .