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Savill P. Self-monitoring unnecessary in type 2 diabetes patients not on insulin therapy. Practitioner 2012 ; 256 (1752): 7

Self-monitoring unnecessary in type 2 diabetes patients not on insulin therapy

20 Jun 2012Registered users

Self-monitoring of blood glucose levels in patients with non-insulin treated type 2 diabetes does not confer any clinical benefit, a recent meta-analysis, published in the BMJ, has concluded. The studies included were randomised controlled trials in patients with non-insulin treated type 2 diabetes comparing an intervention using self-monitoring of blood glucose with clinical management not using self-monitoring. Trials published from 2000 onwards with at least 80 patients were deemed eligible. A total of 2,552 patients were randomised in the six trials included. Dr Peter Savill comments: 'Patients seem to like the reassurance of knowing what their blood glucose is doing whereas clinicians are not convinced that regular testing is necessary to improve wellbeing and outcomes and may feel it is an expense that the NHS cannot afford. Despite a small, albeit significant, reduction in HbA1c level in the self-monitoring group the authors conclude that the evidence from this meta-analysis was not convincing for a clinically meaningful effect on clinical management.This should provide further reassurance for clinicians advising patients that regular monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients who are not taking insulin is unnecessary.'

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